Tessa Whitehouse, ‘“from benevolent hearts & polish’d able pens what may not be hop’d for?”: the Epistolary Construction of Christian Friendships’

Tessa Whitehouse (Queen Mary University of London) will be giving a talk entitled ‘“from benevolent hearts & polish’d able pens what may not be hop’d for?”: the Epistolary Construction of Christian Friendships’, on Tuesday, 13 June 2017 (Eighth Week), from 12.30-2 p.m. Part of the TORCH Enlightenment Correspondences Network seminar series, the session will take place at Ertegun House (37A St Giles, Oxford OX1 3LD) over a free sandwich lunch. A brief abstract of the talk is as follows:

 

Anglophone women letter-writers who were excluded from the mainstream socio-political British establishment due to their gender, religious affiliation or nationality showed themselves to be adept at deploying the linguistic and material practices of epistolary literacy to secure their place as social brokers. This paper will examine the ‘structure of feeling’ that found expression within, and helped to constitute, what Konstantin Dierks has called the ‘emerging new standard for social interaction’ of conducting friendly relationships by letters. It will consider how women used their epistolary literacy and the bonds of friendship to shape inclusive imagined worlds of faith and feeling.

 

Please RSVP to enlightenmentcorr@gmail.com by 6 June if you plan to attend, and please include any special dietary requirements you may have for the lunch.

 

All welcome!

Posted in Seminars

RECSO ANNUAL CONFERENCE – still time to register!

Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies

Registration is now open for the one-day conference ‘Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies’ on Saturday 17th June. Please email joanna.raisbeck@some.ox.ac.uk and kelsey.rubin-detlev@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk by Saturday 3 June. Please provide details of any dietary requirements. Attendance is free, but registration is required. A sandwich lunch will be provided.

See further details in the poster below or visit the conference website at https://c18womenauthorshipidentity.wordpress.com/.

RECSO poster.jpg

Posted in Conferences, RECSO

CFP: Instruments of the Eighteenth Century (forthcoming RECSO/BSECS Seminar Series)

 

Instruments of... CFP A5.jpg

Posted in Call for Papers, RECSO, Seminars

Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

Trinity Term 2017

The seminar will meet weekly, on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in the Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions), except in 1st week, when the session will start at 4.30pm. In weeks 2-8, tea and coffee will be available from 4.45pm. Asterisked speakers are graduates, whose papers may be shorter than usual. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Wed. 26th April 4.30pm (with tea and coffee from 4.15pm)
(1st week) Joint-Session with the Global History Seminar

William Pettigrew and the PEIC group (Kent)
Transoceanic Constitutions: The Corporation
as a Protagonist in Global History, c.
1550-1750

Wed. 3rd May **Geraldine Porter (Merton)
(2nd week) ‘All the reserve of his family, and all the dignity
of his ancestors’: Elite Political Families in the
Eighteenth-Century Houses of Parliament

Wed. 10th May **Hamish Roberts (St Antony’s)
(3rd week) Politicised Millennialism in the Late Eighteenth-
Century British Empire

Wed. 17th May Steve Pincus (Yale)
(4th week) Patriot Fever: Imperial Political Economy and
the Causes of the War of Jenkins Ear

Wed. 24th May Eric Schnakenbourg (Nantes)
(5th week) Shipping and Trade in Wartime under Neutral
Flags in Eighteenth-Century Europe

Wed. 31st May Shunsuke Katsuta (Tokyo)
(6th week) The Bottle Riot reconsidered: Dublin politics of
the early 1820s

Wed. 7th June Undergraduate Thesis Session
(7th week) Two current undergraduates will discuss the
experience and findings of their recently-
completed theses.

Wed. 14th June Ryan Hanley (New)
(8th week) Olaudah Equiano: Celebrity Abolitionist

For information about the seminar, and news of forthcoming events, visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Oxford-seminar-in-mainly-British-History-1680-1850/123050627891042 We would be happy to post notices of interest to our group – contact perry.gauci@lincoln.ox.ac.uk

J. Innes (Somerville), S. Skinner (Balliol); O. Cox (TORCH); B. Harris (Worcester); P. Gauci (Lincoln)

Posted in Seminars

RECSO ANNUAL CONFERENCE: REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies

Registration is now open for the one-day conference ‘Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies’ on Saturday 17th June. Please email joanna.raisbeck@some.ox.ac.uk and kelsey.rubin-detlev@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk by Saturday 3 June. Please provide details of any dietary requirements. Attendance is free, but registration is required. A sandwich lunch will be provided.

See further details in the poster below or visit the conference website at https://c18womenauthorshipidentity.wordpress.com/.

RECSO poster.jpg

Posted in Conferences, Events, RECSO

Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar Trinity Term 2017

TT1618LCSposter.jpg

Image | Posted on by

ROMANTIC RESEARCH SEMINAR TRINITY TERM 2017

TRINITY TERM 2017

Mondays, weeks 1, 3, 5 and 7. Massey Room, Balliol College.

5.30-7pm. All Welcome

Monday 24 April

Sharon Ruston, ‘Editing the Letters of Sir Humphry Davy, 1778-1829’

Monday 8 May

Susan Valladares, ‘“Bringing down the house: Slavery on the early nineteenth-century British stage

Monday 22 May

Anna Camilleri, ‘Gender, Genre, and Juan’

Monday 5 June

Andrew Wynn Owen, Fable and Moral in The Excursion

Christy Edwall, ‘John Clare: “the man of science and of taste”’

Convenors:  Seamus Perry, Balliol College; Fiona Stafford, Somerville College.

Posted in Seminars

2017 Besterman Lecture: David Wootton, ‘Adam Smith: poverty and famine’

The 2017 Besterman Lecture will take place on Thursday, 18 May 2017 (Fourth Week) at 5.15 p.m. in the Queen’s College Shulman Auditorium. David Wootton (Anniversary Professor of History, University of York) will speak on the theme of ‘Adam Smith: poverty and famine’.

Drinks will be served after the lecture. All welcome!

Posted in Lectures, Uncategorized

Peggy Elliott, ‘Crossing the Channel: The Love Letters of Marie Le Prince de Beaumont and Thomas Tyrrell’

On Tuesday, 9 May 2017 (Third Week), Professor Peggy Elliott (Georgia College & State University) will be speaking about the author of ‘Beauty and the Beast’ in a talk entitled, ‘Crossing the Channel: The Love Letters of Marie Le Prince de Beaumont and Thomas Tyrrell’. Part of the TORCH Enlightenment Correspondences Network seminar series, the session will take place at Ertegun House (37A St Giles). Sandwiches will be available from 12.45, with the lecture and discussion taking place from 1 until 2 p.m.

All welcome!

If you plan to attend, please email enlightenmentcorr@gmail.com by Monday, 1 May 2017, and include any dietary requirements for the free sandwich lunch.

Posted in Seminars

Cultures of Collecting Study Day Review:

Study Day review: Cultures of Collecting in Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland

Friday 17th February 2017

Alice Little

RECSO’s event for Hilary Term 2017 was a study day on the history of collecting. Though organised and chaired by a musician (myself) the kinds of collections discussed by the four speakers ranged from libraries to country houses, from folk airs to furniture, and collectors from church organist to chatelaine.

The event was open to all, and participants travelled from across the British Isles to attend: institutions in London, Manchester and Carlow (Ireland) were represented; and of course we also welcomed a number of undergraduate and graduate students, and staff members, from Oxford itself, as well as interested members of the public.

Dr Karen McAulay (Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, Glasgow) kicked off the afternoon with a paper reflecting upon different kinds of collecting, titled ‘Towards a Taxonomy of Collecting?’ Using as case studies the collections of James Simpson, Cam Douglass, and the Maclean-Clephane sisters, Dr McAulay examined the motivations and priorities of these collectors, the reception of their publications, and the assimilation of their collections into larger libraries. To all these collectors it was implicit that the age of a piece of music was what made it valuable to the collector and therefore worthy of preservation.

Dr Tim Eggington (Queens’ College Library, Cambridge) discussed a similar assumption in the collection of what we would today call classical (as opposed to folk) music, in his paper, ‘Collecting the musical past and present at the Academy of Ancient Music in C18th London’. Dr Eggington’s presentation explored the distinctive collecting habits of the Academy’s collections and placed these in the context of the eighteenth-century writings of Charles Burney and John Hawkins, and the collecting of Thomas Tudway, William Boyce, and Benjamin Cooke.

Dr Arthur MacGregor (formerly Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) spoke after the break, and marked the shift of the afternoon from music to country houses with his paper, ‘An Anglo-Irish cabinet of curiosities of the Enlightenment period: the Cobbe collection at Newbridge’. Dr MacGregor reminded us that there is no such thing as a single-subject cabinet of curiosities, and he explained the difficulties he and his necessarily numerous collaborators faced when preparing a catalogue of the collection.

Lizzie Rogers (University of Hull) gave the last paper for the day: ‘Chatelaine, Shopper, Heiress: Female Collecting as Preserving Heritage in the Country House’. Describing the collection and collecting habits of Lady Sabine Winn, Lizzie Rogers took as her focus the female experience in the English country house, for example, the use of gender as a marketing tool in eighteenth-century furniture catalogues; and the corresponding use of the catalogue by Sabine, putting it on display in her house to show that she exercised power in the household equal to that of her husband.

Each paper was followed by questions for the speaker, and at the end of the programme we had a discussion segment in which participants reflected on the questions raised and common themes: the significant role of women in the history of collecting was discussed, and the varying value of the age of an object: contrasting musicians’ focus on the oldest versions they could find with the curiosity seeker and householder searching for or buying the newest and most fashionable items to add to domestic displays.

Discussion continued in the pub and many participants emailed subsequently to ask to be kept informed of future developments and follow-up events.

By way of feedback, one participant communicated that the event was simply “a most interesting day which I very much enjoyed”, while another wrote to say, “I just wanted to thank you for a really excellent afternoon yesterday. The subjects were fascinating, the speakers excellent and the organisation impeccable. I’m so pleased to have been part of it.”

*

We are in the planning stages of a collections-focused seminar series for Michaelmas Term 2017 to be held at the Bate Collection in Oxford, and news of this and similar events will be announced on this page and disseminated through the usual mailing lists. If you would like to be added to the Cultures of Collecting mailing list for events specifically relating to the history of collecting please email alice.little@music.ox.ac.uk.

RECSO’s Trinity Term 2017 event will be our annual conference. Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies will take place on Saturday 17 June.

Posted in RECSO, Study Day